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Tag Archives: contemporary painting

Derry Glare studio by Christine Gray. 2012.

Derry Glare studio by Christine Gray. 2012.

Art-Rated: Your earlier paintings have this concern with a creating a magic, phenomenological space. Your agenda was not always clear, the imagery was sometimes more cryptic. Where was this work coming out of? Read More

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"Texoma", 2011, 84 x 144 inches

"Texoma", 2011, 84 x 144 inches

Tomory Dodge is an artist based in Los Angeles who is known for his vibrant and active abstract paintings that combine gestural brushwork with a highly tuned color sense. His paintings are simultaneously announcing themselves as paintings and as spaces, each layer fueled by the “endless temptation of finding new forms, new phenomena.” Art-Rated was able to catch up with Tomory and discuss his work and ideas:
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Tat Ito in his studio.

Tat Ito in his studio.

by Lily Koto Olive

New York based artist Tat Ito explores themes of human interconnectedness by juxtaposing elements and iconography that stem from his native Japanese culture set against a Western viewpoint. Sprawling environments echo Baroque and Rococo landscapes, while manga-like characters populate the lively surfaces. The influence of Japanese printmaking is evident in the way Ito handles space and compositional decisions, often utilizing gold leaf cloud and wave shapes. These metallic liquid shapes float on top of his environments, but never blending into the lush surfaces beneath.

Like Bosch and Bruegel, Ito invents his own worlds teeming with the characters he creates. His paintings reflect the familiar urban experience of being surrounded while also feeling completely alone. Read More

Review of Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

Originally published by The Brooklyn Rail, March 2012, http://www.brooklynrail.org/2012/03/art_books/margaret-evangeline-shooting-through-the-looking-glass

Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

There is something inherently philosophical in the work of Margaret Evangeline. Every project throughout her active career endeavors to examine and reframe her physical and emotional understanding of the world, easily seen in Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass. The included texts reveal the wealth of source material that influences her, from film to literature to simply her physical location, yet at a certain point these accompanying texts divulge too much of the mystery, and thus emphasize the over-complication in her oil paintings. The photos and minimal attributions describing the artist’s most streamlined work—the bullet paintings—strike a visual and philosophical sweet spot by showcasing her technical execution and conceptual impetus. Read More

Interview and Studio Visit / January, 2012
Conversation with Jonathan Beer, Trudy Benson and Lily Koto Olive

A painting in progress on Trudy Benson's studio wall.

A painting in progress on Trudy Benson's studio wall.

Jonathan Beer: Your work seems to hang in the balance between abstraction and illusion – it’s full of emblematic fragments, painterly mark, different textures, all coming forming a definite kind of space – How did your work get to this point? Read More

On view at Elizabeth Harris Gallery
February 9 – March 10, 2012

by Jonathan Beer

You are Nature is Brooklyn-based artist Greg Lindquist’s most recent body of work currently on view at Elizabeth Harris Gallery. It is comprised of over 15 paintings completed since 2011, as well as two site specific wall paintings.

Spiderweb (If it's raining, no one can see your tears.) Oil on Linen.16 x 24.5 inches. 2012. (Courtesy of the artist.)

In a departure from Lindquist’s earlier work, this show features pieces more decidedly about painterly exploration than his prior interest in smart picture making. While intellect is surely habitual concern for the artist, the hallmark of this show is his temporary suspension of that theoretical backdrop to find enjoyment and intrigue in the act of painting.
As I viewed Lindquist’s work at the opening I could not help but remember a 1964 interview between Larry Rivers and David Hockney. Rivers asked Hockney which was more important to picture making; making something beautiful or interesting. Hockney replied “‎Perhaps the most beautiful paintings are beautifully interesting.” In the case of Greg Lindquist’s work I believe this principle holds true. Read More