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Monthly Archives: March 2012

Eugene Lemay standing in front of one of his works.

Eugene Lemay standing in front of one of his works.

Eugene Lemay’s solo show, Navigator, opens this week at Mike Weiss Gallery. His large scale monochrome landscapes are seemingly quiet images, reminiscent of the foggy landscapes of James McNeill Whistler. Upon closer inspection their mysterious surface comes to life – the images are built from layering of thousands of individual words and characters. Art-Rated’s Jonathan Beer and Lily Koto Olive were able to talk with Eugene about the work:

Art-Rated: The name of the exhibition, Navigator, comes from your time spent as a navigator in the Israeli army.  Are these nocturne landscapes depicting specific locations or landmarks?
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The Cave produced by Cori Beardsley

The Cave produced by Cori Beardsley

Artist Cori Beardsley, along with 20 other artists, performers and musicians have constructed The Cave in the front exhibition space of Frontrunner Gallery and in its project space, both at 59 Franklin St in TriBeca, NYC. The group show, featuring site-specific installations, paintings, drawings, soundscapes, projections, music and theater opens tomorrow evening March 16th, from 6-9 pm.

Art-Rated recently caught up with Cori to discuss the project, process and ideas behind how the project came to evolve.
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Tat Ito in his studio.

Tat Ito in his studio.

by Lily Koto Olive

New York based artist Tat Ito explores themes of human interconnectedness by juxtaposing elements and iconography that stem from his native Japanese culture set against a Western viewpoint. Sprawling environments echo Baroque and Rococo landscapes, while manga-like characters populate the lively surfaces. The influence of Japanese printmaking is evident in the way Ito handles space and compositional decisions, often utilizing gold leaf cloud and wave shapes. These metallic liquid shapes float on top of his environments, but never blending into the lush surfaces beneath.

Like Bosch and Bruegel, Ito invents his own worlds teeming with the characters he creates. His paintings reflect the familiar urban experience of being surrounded while also feeling completely alone. Read More

Review of Ken Johnson’s Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art (Prestel, 2011)

by Lily Koto Olive 

Originally published by The Brooklyn Rail, March 2012, http://www.brooklynrail.org/2012/03/art_books/margaret-evangeline-shooting-through-the-looking-glass 

Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art (Prestel, 2011)

Are You Experienced? How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art (Prestel, 2011)

In Are You Experienced? critic Ken Johnson examines the drug culture of the 1960s and the psychedelic culture it has spawned. Johnson chronicles various artistic movements and media from the 1960s to present day, ranging from Earthworks to cyber-psychedelia, installations to illusionism. As Johnson locates psychedelic consciousness as the origin of art since the 1960s, the nature of psychedelia comes into focus. Johnson brings attention to details that one would notice more in an altered state, such as heightened color, patterns, and grid systems, and the lack of narratives in avant-garde films which focus more on innovative experimental performances. In the sections that address scale and sexual evolution in art, Johnson omits particularly relevant artists and works. Read More

Review of Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

Originally published by The Brooklyn Rail, March 2012, http://www.brooklynrail.org/2012/03/art_books/margaret-evangeline-shooting-through-the-looking-glass

Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass (Charta, 2011)

There is something inherently philosophical in the work of Margaret Evangeline. Every project throughout her active career endeavors to examine and reframe her physical and emotional understanding of the world, easily seen in Margaret Evangeline: Shooting Through the Looking Glass. The included texts reveal the wealth of source material that influences her, from film to literature to simply her physical location, yet at a certain point these accompanying texts divulge too much of the mystery, and thus emphasize the over-complication in her oil paintings. The photos and minimal attributions describing the artist’s most streamlined work—the bullet paintings—strike a visual and philosophical sweet spot by showcasing her technical execution and conceptual impetus. Read More